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Student code 2017-2018

Changes from the 2016-2017 Student Code

The following are those Sections from the 2016-2017 Student Code that had changes made to them for the 2017-2018 Student Code. The text in blue is what's new or different for 2017-2018.

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§ 3-201 Final Examinations
(a) All Students: The following regulations will be applied with the understanding that the University must reasonably accommodate a students religious beliefs, observances, and practices in accordance with § 1-107 and § 1-501 in regard to the scheduling of examinations if the student informs his or her instructor of the conflict within one week after being informed of the examination schedule.Appeal of an instructors decision of such accommodation may be made to the dean of the college in which the course is offered.
(1) Requirement for final examinations: Final examinations will be given during the scheduled final examination period for each course, except in a course that has a character that renders a final examination unnecessary or impracticable, as determined by the instructor. The head or chairperson of the academic department in which the course is offered determines when a final examination is not required.

(2) Change in final examination schedule: The Schedule of Final Examinations for all colleges (except Law and Veterinary Medicine) is prepared and published by the Office of the Registrar (http://registrar.illinois.edu/final-exam-schedule-public).

Instructors must give final examinations at the time specified in the Schedule of Final Examinations unless a change is approved in advance by the Office of the Provost. Requests for change should be submitted through the executive officer of the department in which the course is offered and the dean of the appropriate college. Permission will not be granted to those instructors wishing to change final examinations to a time outside the final examination week. Reading Day should be left entirely free of any mandatory course obligations so that students may use this opportunity to prepare for their upcoming final exams.
(3) Take-home final examinations: If take-home final examinations are assigned, they are to be submitted at the time and date of the regularly scheduled final examination. If instructors wish to depart from this practice, they must follow the procedure for changing the final examination schedule as outlined in § 3-201(a)(2).
(4) Remaining time during an final examination: Instructors are strongly encouraged to assist students in monitoring the amount of time remaining during a given final examination. Instructors are encouraged to verbalize the amount of time remaining in several intervals throughout the duration of the final examination.
(5) A student having more than two consecutive final examinations: No student should be required to take more than two consecutive final examinations. In a semester, this means that a student taking a final examination at 8:00 a.m. and another at 1:30 p.m. on the same day cannot be required to take an final examination that same evening. However, the student could be required to take an final examination beginning at 8:00 a.m. the next day. Similarly, a student having a final examination at 7:00 p.m. one day and another at 8:00 a.m. the next day cannot be required to take an final examination at 1:30 p.m. that second day. Any student having more than two consecutive final examinations is entitled to rescheduling as follows if he or she takes the following action no later than the last day of classes:
(A) The student must investigate whether a conflict final examination is being held at another time for any of the examinations involved. Note: Instructional staff members are urged to announce any conflict final examinations by the last day of classes.
(B) If a conflict final examination has been scheduled for any of the courses, the student must take one or more of these conflict final examinations. If conflict final examinations are offered for more than one course, the student must take the conflict for the course that has the largest number of students.
(C) If no conflict final examinations have been scheduled, the student must contact the instructor of the course having the largest number of students. The contact must be made no later than the last day of classes, and that instructor must provide a makeup final examination.

(6) Normally in a semester several combined-sections, conflict, and noncombined final examinations are given at the same time. As a guide to resolving conflicts, an order of priority has been established within each final examination period, and a student should resolve a conflict using the published final examination schedules and the following priority guidelines.
(A) National and state professional examinations (e.g., CPA, actuarial science, Architecture Registration Examination) take priority over campus final examinations. An instructor must offer a conflict final examination to a student scheduled to take a national or state professional examination and a campus final examination at the same time.
(B) A noncombined course final examination has precedence over any combined-sections or conflict final examination.
(C) A department offering a combined-sections final examination must provide a conflict examination if required to accommodate student conflicts.

(b) Undergraduate Students
(1) Undergraduate students must obtain the approval of the dean of their college to defer a final examination. Undergraduate students who must miss a scheduled final examination should report this fact to the dean of their college as soon as possible and before the final examination period begins.
(2) For satisfactory reasons, students may be “excused” by the dean of their college and examined later by their instructor. Absence from a final examination for any other cause is reported as a final grade of “absent” (ABS) in the course and counts as a failure. (See § 3-103.)

(c) Graduate Students
(1) Graduate students who are unable to take a final examination at the scheduled time or to complete other requirements of a course must make individual arrangements with the instructor. (See § 3-104.)
(2) Approval of this deferment by the dean of the Graduate College is not required.

§ 3-202 Evening, Midterm, and Hourly Examinations
The following regulations will be adhered to regarding examinations given at times other than during regular class periods. These policies do not apply to final examinations.
(a) The scheduling of an evening examination requires the approval of the departmental executive officer unless the course meets regularly on the hour and day the examination is scheduled.

(b) Any examination, except a final, given at other than the regular class hour, and when the University is in session, will be scheduled between 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m., on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday. An examination may also be given on Friday evening or on Saturday morning when, in the opinion of the dean, exceptional circumstances appear to warrant it.

(c) Students are to be excused from one or more regular class periods for an amount of time equivalent to that required for the evening examination.

d) Evening examinations may be given only in courses with multiple sections unless, in the opinion of the departmental executive officer, special circumstances appear to justify an exception.

(e) Conflict or makeup examinations must be arranged for those students who cannot take the scheduled evening examination because of the conflicts arising from participation in any of the following activities:
(1) Other examinations, including special examinations, scheduled at a prior date. Priority will be given to the examination announced in class the earliest in the semester. If the two (or more) examinations being held at the same time were announced on the first day of class of each course, conflict and makeup examinations will be offered by the instructors of all of these courses and the students may choose which conflict or makeup examinations they wish to take.
(2) Regularly scheduled performances or rehearsals.
(3) Regularly scheduled classes., including kinesiology and military.
(4) Sickness, regular employment, or other extenuating circumstances. Appeal of an instructor’s decision regarding the legitimacy of an excused absence may be made to the dean of the college.
(5) Religious observances and practices in accordance with § 1-107 and § 1-501. Appeal of an instructor’s decision regarding the excused absence may be made to the dean of the college in which the course is offered.

(f) Conflict or makeup examinations should be held within one week of the regularly scheduled examinations. If at all possible, c Conflict or makeup examinations should be held during the class period from which students are excused for the evening examination.; when not possible, they should be held between the hours of 7:50 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Monday – Thursday and 7:50 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Friday, unless approved in advance by the Office of the Provost.

(g) A written request, indicating departmental approval (or college approval, when required), for rooms in which to conduct evening or Saturday morning examinations must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar, 901 W. Illinois Street, Urbana, as far in advance of the desired date as possible.

§ 1-108 Nondiscrimination Policy
(a) The commitment of the University to the most fundamental principles of academic freedom, equality of opportunity, and human dignity requires that decisions involving students and employees be based on individual merit and be free from invidious discrimination in all its forms.

(b) It is the policy of the University not to engage in discrimination or harassment against any person because of race, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, disability, national origin, citizenship status, ancestry, age, order of protection status, genetic information, marital status, sexual orientation including gender identity, arrest record status, unfavorable discharge from the military, or status as a protected veteran disabled veteran or a veteran of the Vietnam era and to comply with all federal and state nondiscrimination, equal opportunity, and affirmative action laws, orders, and regulations. This nondiscrimination policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in the University programs and activities. Complaints of invidious discrimination prohibited by University policy are to be resolved within existing University procedures.

(c) For additional information on the equal opportunity, affirmative action, and harassment policies of the University, please contact the Director of The Office of Diversity, Equity, and Access (ODEA) at:

1004 South Fourth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0885
diversity@illinois.edu
diversity.illinois.edu

(d) For additional, or information on Title IX, ADA, or 504, please contact the Lead Title IX Coordinator at the Office of Diversity, Equity and Access (ODEA) Title IX and Disability Office at:

703 S. Wright Street, Third Floor
Champaign, IL 61820
(844) 616-7978
titleixcoordinator@illinois.edu
wecare.illinois.edu/titleix

100 Swanlund Administration Building (MC 304),
601 East John Street,
Champaign, IL 61820,
(217) 333 0886
or visit www.diversity.illinois.edu

§ 3-108 Procedures for Review of Instructor's Ability to Communicate English
(a) All academic departments are to take steps to ensure that all of their instructors are able to communicate clearly in English in the classroom. However, because so many graduate teaching assistants and faculty members come from foreign countries and may not have had extensive training in English, students sometimes find it difficult to understand them.

(b) Students who find themselves in such a situation should initiate the following procedure:
(1) Immediately contact the department head or chairperson of the department in which the course is being offered to report the problem.
(2) If the department head or chairperson determines that a substantial portion of the class members are having a similar problem in understanding the instructor, a new instructor must be assigned to the class section.
(3) If it is determined that only a small minority of the students in the classroom are having problems understanding the instructor, those students should be promptly transferred to another section.
(4) The department head or chairperson should suggest to the instructor that he or she contact the Division of English as an International Language for help.

§ 3-109 3-108 Academic Progress

(a) The progress of the student toward a degree is the concern of the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled.

(b) A student whose progress is unsatisfactory is subject to action by the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled under general provisions adopted by the faculty.

§ 3-110 3-109 Probation and Drop Rules—Undergraduate Students
(a) The following probation and drop rules apply in all undergraduate colleges on the Urbana-Champaign campus. They do not apply in the Graduate College, or the professional Colleges of Law and Veterinary Medicine. (See § 3 609(b) on notification.)
(1) Probationary status serves as a warning to the student that unless his or her scholarship improves, the student is subject to the drop rules.
(2) Probation and drop rules are based on the University of Illinois semester average or on one of the following averages that governs graduation: (1) University of Illinois cumulative average; (2) combined average of the University of Illinois grades and grades in transfer courses. (See § 3 103 on computation of scholastic averages.)

(b) Probation Rules
The following regulations shall be used to determine a student’s probationary status, provided drop rules do not apply:
(1) Beginning Freshmen
A beginning freshman who does not earn at least a 2.0 (C) average in his or her first semester or during summer session is placed on a 2.0 probation for the next semester or summer session in which the student is registered.
(2) Students other than beginning freshmen
(A) A student whose cumulative average is 2.0 or better and who does not earn at least a 2.0 average in any semester or during summer session is placed on a 2.0 probation for the next semester or summer session in which he or she is registered.
(B) A student whose cumulative average is 1.75 to 1.99 inclusive is placed on a 2.25 probation.
(C) A student whose cumulative average is less than 1.75 is placed on a minimum 2.33 probation.
(D) A student may be placed on a “probationary status” at any time when, in the judgment of the college, his or her scholastic record warrants such action. Likewise, the probation rules may be waived when, in the judgment of the college, a student’s scholastic record indicates that the warning provided by the probationary status is unwarranted.
(3) Scholastic probationary status at the University may not be cleared by attendance at another institution except by special action of the dean of the student’s college.
(4) Transfer work averages below C level may result in a student being placed on probation if the combined average does not reflect a 2.0 standing.
(5) (4) Removal from probation. Students on academic probation for failure to maintain the minimum grade-point average are returned to non-probationary standing upon obtaining a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 (C = 2.0) or better.

(c) Drop Rules
The following regulations shall be used to determine if a student is to be dropped from the University.
(1) A student is dropped if he or she fails to earn at least a 1.0 (D) average in any academic semester (not including summer session).
(2) A student on probation who fails to meet his or her established probation level is dropped unless the student has achieved at least a 2.0 average or better for that semester and his or her cumulative average is at least 2.0.
(3) A student who fails to make satisfactory progress toward a degree is dropped. Examples would be the repeated failure of a required course or failure to meet other conditions for continuation in the curriculum.
(4) A nondegree or part-time student who fails to complete the conditions of admission or continuation is dropped.
(5) The drop rules may be waived when, in the judgment of the student’s college, his or her scholastic record warrants such action.

§ 3-802 Minimum Scholarship Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree
(a) All candidates for a degree must have at least a 2.0 (C) average on all University of Illinois credits counted for graduation requirements. and at least a 2.0 average on the combined transfer and University of Illinois credits counted for graduation requirements. Certain colleges have established higher scholastic graduation requirements for specific curricula. (Grades in courses taken at the other campuses of the University are counted as transferred.)

(b) Where a course has been repeated, both the original and subsequent grades are included in the average if the course is acceptable toward graduation, but the credit is counted only once. An original failing grade is not removed from the student’s record for a course subsequently passed by special examination. (See § 3 309 on repeated courses.)

(c) Students at the Urbana-Champaign campus who do not meet the requirements stated above may graduate if they have the minimum grade-point average calculated by either of the following alternate methods:
(1) Exclude courses in which grades of D or F have been recorded not to exceed a total of ten semester hours completed prior to the last thirty hours of work completed at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign campus, and counted for graduation requirements, or
(2) A grade average of no less than 2.1 for the last sixty semester hours of work counted for graduation requirements and completed at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign campus, except in those curricula where a higher scholastic graduation requirement is specified.

(d) Each college office, on request, informs the student regarding the scholarship regulations of that college.

§ 3-203 Proficiency Examinations
(a) All Students
(1) Proficiency exams offer students the opportunity to earn academic credit that counts toward degree completion without actually taking the course for which they earn the credit.
(2) Information concerning proficiency examinations may be obtained from the student’s college or from the department offering the course for which the student wishes to earn proficiency credit. Except as provided in subsection (3)(D) below, a student must secure the consent of the head or chairperson of the department concerned to take these examinations.
(3) Departmental proficiency examinations may be taken only by the following:
(A) Students who are currently enrolled for courses on the Urbana-Champaign campus. (A person attending only as an auditor is not considered to be “currently enrolled.”) For the purpose of this rule, a student who has completed the work of fall semester or winter session is considered to be “currently enrolled for courses” for fifteen days after the close of the final examination period, including graduating seniors; and a student who has completed the work of spring semester or a summer session is considered to be “currently enrolled for courses” up to the end of the registration period for the following fall semester, including graduating seniors.
(B) Persons who have been previously registered in a degree program and are currently registered in an online course, guided individual study, or an extramural course offered by the University.
(C) Persons who are not registered in the University at the time they wish to take a departmental proficiency exam but who are candidates for undergraduate degrees at the University of Illinois who need no more than ten semester hours to complete the requirements for their degrees. (See § 3 204 on special examinations.)
(D) Students who participate in the proficiency testing sessions offered during New Student Welcome Week, at the beginning of the fall semester, or at the beginning of the spring semester. Credit earned by this method does not become a part of the student’s University record until after he or she has completed registration.
(4) Departmental proficiency examinations may NOT be taken in the following circumstances:
(A) To earn credit for a course that has been failed, meaning the student earned a grade of F, FR, or ABS. (See § 3 204 on special examinations.)
(B) To change to a PS an earned grade that was lower than what the student desired.
(C) To earn credit for an elementary-level college course which is part of a sequence of courses covering elementary- and intermediate-level material when the student has already received credit, or is scheduled to receive credit, for one or more than one semester of work in the subject.
(5) The grade for proficiency examinations is PS or F.
(A) A grade of PS is awarded when the student earns at least a C- on the examination. Individual departments may set the minimum passing score for their departmental proficiency exams to be higher than a C-.
(B) A grade of F is awarded when the student earns lower than a C-, or lower than the department’s minimum score. An F is not recorded in the student’s official academic record and does not appear on his or her transcript. However, departments may keep internal records and prohibit a student from re-taking the departmental proficiency examination.
(C) The department that offers a departmental proficiency exam is responsible for submitting PS grades to the Registrar’s Office within 4 weeks of the date of the proficiency exam.
(6) Proficiency examinations are generally given at no cost to the student; however, a fee may be charged for proficiency examinations from agencies outside the University.
(7) Students wishing to take a proficiency examination in a subject not offered at the campus at which they are or have been registered, but offered at another campus of the University, may do so upon satisfying the above conditions, provided they obtain approval from their primary campus (the campus at which they were last registered) for concurrent registration prior to taking the examination.
(8) Departments have no obligation to administer proficiency exams to students from other institutions who are not currently enrolled at the University of Illinois, as defined in subsection (a)(3)(A) above.

(b) Undergraduate Students
(1) Proficiency examinations for advanced standing are offered in all University courses normally open to freshmen and sophomores.
(2) A student may take proficiency examinations in more advanced undergraduate courses on the recommendation of the head or chairperson of the department and with the approval of the dean of the college in which the department offering the proficiency exam is located.
(3) Proficiency examinations for advanced courses may be taken by graduating seniors at any time designated by the instructor within the time limits of subsection (a)(3)(A) above.
(4) Undergraduate students who pass a proficiency examination are given credit toward graduation for the amount regularly allowed in the course, provided such credit does not duplicate credit counted for admission to the University and provided the credit is acceptable in their curriculum.
(5) Credit earned by a proficiency examination does not count toward satisfying the minimum requirement of sixty semester hours of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign credit. (See § 3 801 for details on the credit requirements for a bachelor’s degree.)

(c) Graduate Students
(1) Graduate students may satisfy specific requirements by passing proficiency examinations.
(2) Credit earned by passing a proficiency examination cannot be applied toward graduate degrees.

§ 3-204 Special Examinations
(a) Special examinations offer students who failed a course another opportunity to pass the course and earn academic credit counting toward degree completion.
(b) A special examination may be given only in the following circumstances:
(1) the student earned a failing grade (F, FR, or ABS) in the University of Illinois course.
(2) a special examination is recommended by the head or chair of the department offering the course which the student failed, or by an individual duly authorized by the head or chair, whether the course is traditional, blended, online, Guided Individual Study, or other.
(3) the special examination is approved by the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled.
(4) a special examination permit was issued by the Office of the Registrar because the individual seeking the special examination is a currently enrolled student, or is a former student who is not currently registered but who has no more than 10 semester hours remaining to complete his or her degree.
(5) the instructor designates when the special examination will be given, within the time limits of § 3-203, subsection (a)(3)(A), including for graduating seniors; but students who are not currently enrolled in the University and who have failed an online course or a Guided Individual Study course must take the Special Examination within 30 days of grade roll.
(A) The exam must be administered after the close of the semester, winter session, or summer session in which the course was failed.
(B) The exam must be administered before the end of the next semester in which the student is registered following failure in the course.
(c) A student who has been dropped from the University is not eligible to take special examinations unless he or she has been reinstated and meets the conditions stated in § 3-203(a)(3)(A) above.
(d) Special examinations are given at no additional cost to the student.
(e) Special examination grades are reported as PS or F.
(1) A grade of PS is awarded when the student earns at least a C- on the examination.
(2) A grade of F is awarded when the student earns lower than a C-.
(3) An F is not recorded in the student’s official academic record and does not appear on his or her transcript. However, departments may prohibit a student from retaking the examination.
(4) The instructor that administers the special exam is responsible for submitting PS grades to the Registrar’s Office within 4 weeks of the date of the exam.
(5) A student given a grade of PS in a special examination will receive the credit normally allowed for the course, subject to all regulations governing the individual student’s curriculum.
(6) Grades earned on special examinations are not included in the computation of grade point averages. (A passing grade on a special examination does not remove the previously earned failing grade.)

§1-102 In the Classroom
The instructor, in the classroom and in conference, should encourage free discussion, inquiry, and expression. Student performance should not be evaluated on opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards.
(a) Students should be free to take reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled.

(b) Students should have protection through orderly procedures against prejudiced or capricious academic evaluation. At the same time, they are responsible for maintaining standards of academic performance established for each course in which they are enrolled.

(c) Information about student views, beliefs, and political associations that instructors acquire in the course of their work as instructors, advisers, and counselors should be considered confidential. Protection against improper disclosure is a serious professional obligation. Judgments of ability and character may be provided under appropriate circumstances, normally with the knowledge or consent of the student.

(d) The instructor is in charge of the orderly conduct of the class and may exclude a student or an auditor who does not comply with a reasonable request in this regard. If the student is registered for the course and if the disruption is repeated or so egregious as to violate other conduct regulations, (usually § 1-302(f)), the instructor, after consultation with the department head or designee and the Executive Director of the Senate Committee on Student Discipline, may exclude the student from the class until such time as the disciplinary matter has been resolved. If the disciplinary matter is resolved in a manner that permits the student to return to class, the instructor, in consultation with the department head and the Executive Director of the Senate Committee on Student Discipline or designee, shall decide whether and to what extent the student will be permitted to make up course work missed while excluded from class.

(e) Should a student feel that his or her rights as a student have been violated, the student may discuss the matter, to the extent possible, with his or her instructor in the relevant course. If a resolution cannot be reached, the student may contact the head of the department in which the course is being offered. If further assistance is needed, the student may contact the dean’s office of the college offering the course. Assistance navigating the process is available through the Student Assistance Center in the Office of the Dean of Students at (217) 333-0050 or helpdean@illinois.edu Monday-Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

§ 2-601 Operation of Motor Vehicles
(a) The parking or storage of a motor vehicle, or motorcycle, or bicycle in any University building or structure other than a designated parking structure is prohibited without the prior written authorization of the Facilities and Services Parking Department. Such unauthorized parking or storage shall be considered abandonment, and the motor vehicle, or motorcycle, or bicycle shall be removed at the owner’s expense by the Parking Department.
(b) Complete information concerning parking limitations and other details of the student automobile regulations, including monetary and other penalties for noncompliance or violations, is available from the Facilities and Services Parking Department, 1110 West Springfield 1201 W. University Avenue, Urbana, or visit the department’s Web site at www.parking.uiucillinois.edu.

§ 3-304 Registration of Nondegree Students
(a) Nondegree students register under one of the two registration options:
(1) Academic year: Fall and spring semesters with optional summer and winter sessions.
(2) Summer term only: Registration for fall and spring terms is not allowed; application for admission is necessary to be considered for the academic year enrollment pattern.
(b) Part-time nondegree students are subject to the following restrictions:
(1) The college of enrollment (home department, at the graduate level) has the right to terminate a continuing nondegree student’s registration authorization at any time prior to the beginning of a term.
(2) Registration is limited to part-time status (less than twelve credit hours) in the fall or spring semester.
(3) Part-time nondegree students are ineligible for early registration for the fall or spring semester; they may, however, register as follows:
(A) Starting on July 15 or the next business day for the fall semester.
(B) Starting the next business day after the advanced registration period concludes for degree-seeking students for the winter session and spring semester;
(C) Summer session opens to degree-seeking and nondegree students simultaneously.
(4) The same grading system is applicable to degree and nondegree students. Credit earned on nondegree status is not applicable to a degree except by subsequent admission to degree status and, at the graduate and professional level, successful petition for application of such credit to the degree. A maximum of twelve hours of graduate credit earned while on nondegree status may be applied to a degree.
(5) Nondegree students must apply for admission to be considered for degree status enrollment.
(c) Persons admitted to the university for participation in the following programs are eligible for full-time status, and thus early registration privileges:
(1) online and/or off-campus programs;
(2) university-affiliated exchange programs;
(3) study abroad programs for students who are enrolled at other institutions.
(d) No other students are given the privilege of full-time nondegree status without the permission of both the college admitting the student and the colleges offering the courses in which the student wishes to enroll.
(e) Students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield are part-time nondegree students, ineligible for early registration in the fall or spring semester.

§ 3-307 Late Registration (a) General Provisions
(1) The individual colleges determine the latest date on which their students may register.
(2) Students initiating registration after the first day of instruction in a fall or spring semester will be assessed a late registration charge of $15 (amount subject to change). No late registration charge is assessed for the summer term.
(3) The late registration charge may be waived upon petition in exceptional circumstances, such as serious illness or death in the immediate family, or other circumstances beyond the control of the student. The petition is available on the Office of the Registrar website.
(4) Students who are registering only for second eight-week or non-standard part-of-semester courses are not registering late, provided their registration is completed before the second class meeting.
(5) The late registration charge is not covered by scholarships or other tuition and fee waivers.

(b) Registration after the first ten days of a term
(1) A student who registers after the first ten days of a term must have a Late Registration Form completed and approved by the department offering the course.
(2) Undergraduate students must submit the completed Late Registration Form to their college office to complete the registration. Graduate students must submit the completed Late Registration Form to the Graduate College. A service representative will register the student in the courses approved on the form.

§ 2-402 Library Policies & Regulations
The University Library exists primarily to provide intellectual and physical access to information and services that support the university’s educational mission. To provide physical access, the Library circulates library materials to the faculty, staff and student body of the University. The privilege of borrowing materials for use outside the Library is accorded to all faculty, staff, students, and other persons accredited by the Library. The use of licensed electronic resources is accorded to all current university faculty, staff, and students.

(a) Use of Library Materials
(1) Most library materials may be borrowed for home use and renewed to extend the loan. Loan periods vary from a few days to several weeks, however, most materials have a loan period of between 4 weeks (undergraduate students) and 16 weeks (graduate students). Renewing materials will generally extend the loan from the date of the renewal, by a period of time similar to that of the original loan. All such materials are subject to recall at any time, and all Library users are fined for failing to return a recalled item on time. Reference books, items reserved for classes, and periodicals are generally not allowed out of the library.
(2) Any student who steals or mutilates library materials will be subject to university discipline.
(3) Electronic resources made available by the Library to students are for activities that support the university's educational mission. The Library's ability to provide access, authorize use, and permit reproduction of licensed resources is governed by contractual license agreements and U.S. Copyright Law. These license agreements are negotiated between the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois and publishers or third party brokers. These legally binding contracts allow students to access these resources for non-commercial, educational, scholarly and research purposes. Students using of library-licensed resources must comply with the terms of agreements and be aware that publishers may monitor use of electronic resources to ensure that the terms of their licensing agreements are enforced. Breach of license may lead a publisher/vendor to turn off the University's access without warning. Consequently, the Library works closely with contractual partners and the Campus' Chief Information Officer to resolve issues surrounding questionable use as they arise.
(4) Any students who misuse commercially licensed electronic resources may be referred to appropriate campus disciplinary bodies and have on and off-campus access privileges suspended.
(5) A student ID card serves as a library card and may be used in the University Libraries of all three campuses or any Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI)-member school.
(6) Students have access to the main stacks upon presentation and validation of their current ID card. Any student may request to have materials paged for them.
(7) Some material, due to its condition, scarcity, or value, may be restricted to building use only.
(8) Some library locations may require students to show identification, register, and/or check bags and coats before using library materials.

(b) Charges (subject to change without notice)
(1) Library materials, with the exception of special items, can be returned to any library drop box on campus. Special items, such as fragile items, media materials, loanable technology, reserves, and other short-term loans, must be returned to the departmental library from which they were borrowed. Interlibrary loan materials must be returned to the central circulation desk at the entrance to the main stacks in the Main Library.
(2) Most library materials are not subject to overdue fines, except heavily-used materials such as reserves, recalled material, media, loanable technology and building-use only materials. Items not returned by the time indicated in the library’s database are subject to a late charge. Library fines are subject to change without notice.
(3) The date recorded in the library’s database is the official record of the time when an item must be returned to the Library. Overdue notices are sent as a courtesy only, and failure to receive one is not a reason for cancellation or reduction of late charges.
(4) Special items, such as fragile items, media materials, loanable technology, reserves, and other short-term loans may also be subject to late charges if kept past the time due. These charges may vary from one library to another, depending on the item or the library location.
(5) Materials recalled for another library user or for reserve purposes may have a reduced loan period; the revised due date is the effective one. All patrons will be fined if a recalled item is not returned by the date specified in the recall notice. A patron will be billed a lost-book charge if the book is not returned when a recall notice is issued.
(6) The loss of any item should be reported immediately to the library from which it was borrowed. Any lost library materials that have become overdue are subject to late charges until personally reported lost. If the item cannot be recovered by the borrower within a reasonable length of time, the borrower will be charged the cost of replacing the material.
(7) Special collections are subject to different regulations and policies.

(c) Collection of Library Charges All library charges for overdue and lost materials are forwarded to University Student Financial Services & Cashier Operations (USFSCO) for collection. Students wishing to appeal charges for overdue and lost materials may contact the Library Billing Office.

(d) Use of Library Premises
The Library provides students with an environment conducive to teaching, learning, research, study, and to the conduct of University business. Students using the Library are expected to act responsibly, appropriately, and courteously in order to preserve the Library's environment, facilities, and collections as described in the Patron Conduct Policy:
http://www.library.illinois.edu/administration/services/policies/patron_conduct.html. Students who violate any of these policies, or any other policies of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, may lose their privileges to use the Library, be subject to university-imposed discipline, and/or be subject to criminal prosecution or other legal action, as appropriate.

§ 3 312 Dropping Courses for Academic Deficiency
(b) A student requesting to drop a course in which he or she has become seriously deficient may be required by the dean of the college to accept the grade of F for the course.
(b) The college office may drop a student for academic deficiency using the student registration system. In such cases, the dean notifies the Office of the Registrar to record a grade of F for the course.

§ 3 313 §3-312 Withdrawal from the University—General Rules

§ 3 314 §3-313 Withdrawal from the University for Military or Other National Defense Services

§ 2-605 Operation of Bicycles
(a) Bicycles on campus must be operated at all times in accordance with the current University Bicycle Ordinance located at go.illinois.edu/bikeordinance.
(b) Bicycles shall be parked on campus only in an area that is designated by the presence of racks for bicycle parking.
(c) Students may register bicycles for campus use with Facilities and Services at no charge.
(d) Bicycle theft should be reported to the University Police Department at (217) 333-1216.

§ 3 803 English Requirement for Graduation
(a) Satisfactory proficiency in the use of English is a requirement for all undergraduate degrees awarded at the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University. This proficiency can be certified by the satisfactory completion of a one-semester, four-hour course of either Rhetoric 105 or 108 or by the satisfactory completion of the two-semester, six-hour sequence of Speech Communication 111 and 112 (Verbal Communication). A student with a sufficiently high score on either the ACT English Subtest or the SAT Verbal Test and high performance on a written essay examination will satisfy the English requirement for graduation.
(b) If the academic credentials of a transfer student do not indicate fulfillment of course work equivalent to the University of Illinois English graduation requirement, the student may be administered the Rhetoric Placement and Proficiency Examination, the English Placement Test (EPT), or the Transfer Writing Examination.
(c) Under certain conditions students may satisfy the English requirement for graduation through satisfactory completion of courses offered by the Division of English as an International Language. Satisfactory completion of ESL courses (ESL 114 and ESL 115) satisfies the English graduation requirement. Evidence that a student is eligible to enroll in these courses is established by a satisfactory score on the ESL Placement Test, a test of oral and written English administered by the Division of English as an International Language. On the basis of this test, the student will be enrolled in the course or courses appropriate to his or her English needs.
(d) If a student’s score on the EPT is higher than the proficiency level of students in ESL 115, that student must take the Rhetoric Placement and Proficiency Examination offered by the Department of English.
(e) Those students whose deficiency in English requires that they take one or more of the ESL noncredit courses (ESL 109, ESL 110, and ESL 111) are not allowed to register for a full academic program and must complete their noncredit requirements before enrolling in the ESL 114 115 sequence.

§ 3 804 Credit for Kinesiology (Physical Education)
Credit earned in kinesiology (physical education) courses may be included in the scholastic average at the discretion of the individual colleges and may, at the discretion of the individual colleges, be included in the total hours required for graduation. Kinesiology (physical education) courses numbered from 100 through 110 are kinesiology (physical education) activity courses. Kinesiology (physical education) courses numbered above 110 are professional or advanced courses. (See § 3 802.)

§ 3 805 Language Credit (a) Except as prohibited or limited by the established policy of the student’s college, credit in University non-primary language courses taken to remove high school entrance deficiencies may, at the discretion of the college:
(1) be counted in the total hours required for graduation, or
(2) be accepted in partial or complete satisfaction of the non-primary language requirement for the degree.
(b) Normally no more than ten hours of proficiency credit for the study of a single non-primary language at the elementary and intermediate level shall be counted for graduation in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Additional credit may be granted for advanced courses emphasizing literature and language structure rather than communicative competence in the language.

§ 3 806 Credit for Undergraduate Open Seminar Courses (a) Credit in each 199 course shall not be less than one nor more than five credit hours per semester, and may vary from student to student.
(b) A student may accumulate an unlimited number of credit hours in 199 courses, but no more than twelve such hours listed on the student’s transcript may be counted toward fulfilling graduation requirements, except in cases in which a larger number of credit hours in 199 courses is an integral part of a formal, college-approved program of study (e.g., Individual Plans of Study, Unit I).
(c) If a specific 199 topic offering has an enrollment that averages twenty or more for the semesters in which it is offered during two consecutive academic years, the topic may be offered in the third year only if a proposal to establish it as a regular course is submitted in the normal manner promptly after the beginning of the second semester of the second year of such enrollment. The topic may be offered as 199 in the third and subsequent years (whatever the enrollment then proves to be) only until a decision is made on the proposal of a regular course. If the regular course proposal is approved, the topic may then be offered only in that form; if the regular course proposal is disapproved, the topic may not be offered again.
(d) A 199 course appears on a student’s transcript with the departmental rubric and the title “Undergraduate Open Seminar.” The topic covered may be identified in the student’s permanent record. Students and former students who wish to provide the topic or content of such a course must do so by making a request directly to the department responsible for the course. The department is obligated to maintain a permanent record of all such courses offered.

§ 3 801 Credit Requirements for Degrees
(a) First Bachelor’s Degree
(1) In addition to specific course and scholastic average requirements, each candidate for a bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign must earn at least 60 semester hours of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign credit, of which at least 21 hours must be 300 or 400 level courses at a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus location.
(2) A student on drop status may not graduate until he or she has been reinstated by the dean of his or her college. A student who meets the conditions of subsection (a)(1) above must notify the dean of his or her college of the student’s intent to apply credit earned elsewhere toward the degree requirements and arrange to have a final official transcript from the other collegiate institution(s) attended sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
(3) Only those courses that are applicable toward the degree sought may be counted in satisfying the above minimum requirements. (See §§ 3-804 and 3-805.) (See the Academic Catalog at http://catalog.illinois.edu/)
(4) Students transferring from the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield to Urbana-Champaign as candidates for degrees must satisfy the degree requirements in subsection (a)(1) and academic requirements for graduation established for the curriculum entered on the Urbana-Champaign campus.
(5) A student who requests that the credit requirement for graduation be waived should complete and submit a petition to the dean of his or her college, who will take action on the petition.

(b) Second Bachelor’s Degree
(1) A student who has received one bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign may be permitted to receive a second bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, provided all specified requirements for both degrees are fully met and provided also that the curriculum offered for the second degree includes at least 30 semester hours of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign credit that is not counted for the other degree.
(2) The second bachelor’s degree may be earned either concurrently with or subsequent to the first degree.
(3) Only those courses that are acceptable toward the degree sought may be counted in satisfying the above minimum requirements. This includes the 30 additional hours required for the second degree.

(c) Graduate Students
(1) At least half of the hours required for a master’s degree must be earned in courses meeting on the Urbana-Champaign or Chicago or Springfield campus, or in courses meeting in other locations that have been approved by the Graduate College.
(2) At least two-thirds of the total hours required for a doctoral degree must be earned in courses meeting on the Urbana-Champaign or Chicago campus, or in courses meeting in other locations that have been approved by the Graduate College.
(3) BTAA Traveling Scholars Program work may fulfill the “on-campus” requirement in subsections (c)(1) and (c)(2) for as much as 20 semester hours of course work at BTAA institutions each semester, for a maximum of two semesters.

§ 2-103 Student Health Insurance
(a) The University Board of Trustees requires all students, except as allowed in § 3-506(c), to be covered by health insurance, either through a program provided by the University or one determined to be compliant with the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

(1) If the ACA is repealed or amended during any academic year, the University will review any law replacing it to determine what impact, if any, the new law has on the university’s existing policies and practices and will notify the university community, including its students, as soon as practicable. Additionally, the University will work to revise this policy in line with the new law prior to the beginning of the next academic year.

(b) The fee for the Student Health Insurance Plan is assessed along with other tuition and fees. For graduate students, waiver-generating appointments include partial payment of the Health Insurance Fee.

(c) Coverage extends, including semester breaks, from the Saturday before the first day of classes for a given semester and terminates at midnight on the Friday prior to the next consecutive semester’s coverage date. The summer term is considered a semester.

(d) Plan benefits are detailed in the Student Health Insurance Plan brochure hosted on the Student Health Insurance website, si.illinois.edu. The fee/premium is charged per semester. The summer term is considered a semester. No semester amount can be prorated.

(e) All changes to the plan, waiver of the fee, extension of coverage, and purchase of dependent coverage, must be completed during the semester’s Enrollment /Change Period, which is posted on the website, si.illinois.edu. All changes must be completed according to the Student Health Insurance policy. Changes attempted by any other means will not be valid. Requests for changes included with tuition and fee payments will not be valid. Refer to the Student Health Insurance website at si.illinois.edu or call the Student Health Insurance office for details on insurance enrollment/change procedures.

(f) Students who wish to cover their dependents must purchase dependent insurance each semester during the Insurance Enrollment/Change Period. The summer term is considered a semester.

(1) Dependent coverage is only available if the student is covered, through registration or extension, by the Student Health Insurance Plan for the requested semester.

(2) Dependent coverage must be purchased during the Insurance Enrollment/Change Period, or within thirty-one days of acquiring a new dependent (marriage, birth, adoption, civil union, and entry into the U.S.).

(3) For dependents added after the Enrollment/Change Period, coverage becomes effective on the date of application and receipt of premium.

(g) Students who wish to apply for extension of coverage beyond the last semester enrolled and insured must apply for that extension during the specified dates given on the Student Health Insurance website at si.illinois.edu. Extension of dependent coverage must also be completed during that time. Only one consecutive semester of coverage beyond the semester for which the student was enrolled and assessed the fee can be granted.

(h) If a student wishes to opt out from the Student Health Insurance Fee, a waiver application must be completed and approved within the Insurance Enrollment/Change Period for the semester. A student who wishes to opt out from the fee must present health insurance coverage that is compliant with the ACA. The policy must be in force on or before the first day of classes for the semester for which the waiver is being requested.

Evidence of ACA compliant health insurance coverage must be a copy of the schedule of medical benefits and a certificate of coverage or notice on company letterhead from the employer or company certifying coverage of the student. The waiver will continue in effect until the end of that academic year. If waiver from the Student Health Insurance Plan is approved, the student is responsible to maintain ACA compliant health insurance coverage while enrolled in the University of Illinois.

(i) Reinstatements are for students who have completed a waiver by showing proof of other ACA compliant health insurance and now wish to reinstate themselves into the Student Health Insurance Plan. Reinstatements must be done in person. No forms are available on the Student Health Insurance website. There are two ways to reinstate:

(1) Change of Status Reinstatement. Students who are in opted-out status from the Student Health Insurance Plan and want to be reinstated to the plan may apply by providing proof of loss of other insurance; i.e., notice of termination of insurance from the insurance company or employer. This must be done within 63 days of such loss of other insurance. Enrollment is guaranteed with coverage effective on the date of application or date of termination of other insurance, whichever is later. Students must be registered for the semester they wish to reinstate, and they must be eligible to be assessed the fee. Change of status reinstatement can be done throughout the semester, based on the termination of your other health insurance. The full semester fee will be charged.

(2) Enrollment/Change Reinstatement. Students who are in opted-out status from the Student Health Insurance Plan, and who want to be reinstated to the plan, MUST apply during the Insurance Enrollment /Change Period for the semester they wish to reinstate. They must be registered for the semester they wish to reinstate, and they must be eligible to be assessed the fee.

§ 3-401 The Dean's List
(a) The names of eligible undergraduates who have achieved a grade-point average for a given semester that places them approximately in the top 20 percent of their college will be included on a list prepared for the dean of the college. The GPA level for the Dean’s List will be set by each college and may be adjusted periodically.

(b) To be eligible for Dean’s List recognition, students must complete at least fourteen 12 academic semester hours taken for a letter grade (A through F). Students with I, DFR, or missing grades will be added as soon as letter grades are resolved and eligibility can be determined.

(c) Students who are registered with the Center for Wounded Veterans (CWV) or with Disability Resources and Educational Services (DRES) who are enrolled less than 12 but a minimum of nine graded semester hours who are in the top 20 percent of their college are also eligible. Such students must sign a release with CWV or DRES indicating their consent for consideration for Dean’s List eligibility and have submitted that consent to their home unit’s academic affairs office no later than Reading Day in the semester in which they wish to be considered for Dean’s List. These consent forms are valid only for the semester in which they are issued, and students must submit by the deadline updated consent forms for each semester in which they wish to be considered for Dean’s List.

§ 1-111 Sexual Misconduct Policy (f)

(f) Danielle Morrison serves as the University’s Title IX and Disability Coordinator and can be contacted at the Title IX and Disability Office, 703 S. Wright Street, Third Floor, Champaign, IL 61820; by phone at (844) 616-7978; or by email at titleixcoordinator@illinois.edu.

§ 3-505 Fee Assessment (h)
(h) Student Initiated Fees – All Student Initiated Fees (1strike>-10 11) listed below were implemented as referenda questions approved by the students during the student election process. Upon approval each Student Initiated fee was approved by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees. Similarly, a student referendum affirmed the role of the Student Fee Advisory Committee (SFAC) to provide recommendations to the Chancellor regarding the dollar amount of each Student Initiated Fee. The SFAC review process will at least follow the rotation schedule below. Continuation of an existing fee will be reaffirmed by student vote as per the rotation schedule below. A new Student Initiated Fee may be established upon affirmation of a student body vote. The following fees will be reviewed at least every four years in the following order: Year 1-Krannert Center Fee, Collegiate Readership Fee; Year 2-Cleaner Energy Technologies Fee, Sustainable Campus Environment Fee, and Legacy of Service and Learning Scholarship Fee; Year 3-Cultural Programming Fee, Students for Equal Access to Learning Fee, and Bicycle Programs and Infrastructure Fee; Year 4- Student Organization Resource Fee, Study Abroad and Travel Scholarship Fee, and Media Fee. All Student Initiated Fees shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(1) Cleaner Energy Technologies Fee (CET) A fee used to purchase cleaner energy technologies for campus, including solar, wind, hydrogen and geothermal projects, energy efficiency purchases, and the purchase of renewable energy from non-University producers. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(2) Collegiate Readership Fee
A fee to fund the Collegiate Readership Program, which provides free copies of various newspapers. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(3) Cultural Programming Fee (CP)
A fee that supports cultural programming within six areas: African-American, Asian-American, Latina/o, LGBT, Native American and women’s programming. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(4) Krannert Center Fee
A fee to support productions at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts (KCPA). This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(5) Legacy of Service and Learning Scholarship (LSLS) Fee
A fee creating a new and permanent source of need/merit-based scholarships which include a community service component. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(6) Student Organization Resource Fee (SORF)
A fee to help fund programs and/or services of Registered Student Organizations. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(7) Students for Equal Access to Learning (SEAL) Fund
A fee which supplements existing financial aid for students with financial need. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(8) Study Abroad and Travel Scholarship Fee
A fee to provide scholarships to undergraduate students for study abroad and the graduate and professional students for travel scholarships. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(9) Sustainable Campus Environment Fee (SCEF)
A fee to help establish a sustainable campus environment by financing initiatives such as green buildings, engagement of the University community, recycling, energy efficiency, and environmentally responsible purchasing. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(10) Media Fee
A fee to support Illini Media Company which operates The Daily Illini, Illio, WPGU, and other campus-based media. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.
(11) Bicycle Programs and Infrastructure Fee
A fee used to fund better bike infrastructure, expanding bike parking, creating safety courses and materials for bike encouragement and education, and creating a bike rental program. This fee shall be reviewed by the Student Body via student referendum no less than once every four years.

§ 2-303 Requirements for Registration for Registered Organizations and Registered Student Organizations
(4) The organization must provide a statement executed by the authorized agent(s) for the organization that includes the following:
(A) that the authorized agent(s) are authorized to act on behalf of the organization in its relations with the University.
(B) the names, contact information and University Identification Numbers (UIN) of the officers of the organization, and a designation of which officers perform the duties of president and treasurer.
(C) that Registered Organization membership is restricted to emeritus/a faculty, faculty, staff, and their spouses/partners. Only emeritus/a faculty and currently appointed faculty and staff may serve as officers and authorized agents. Such an organization is not eligible for funding allocations from the Student Organization Resource Fee (SORF) (§ 3-505(i)(h)); or
(D) that Registered Student Organization membership is comprised with a majority of student members, and that student membership is restricted to currently enrolled students at the Urbana-Champaign campus and their spouses/partners. Currently appointed faculty/staff and their spouses/partners also may be members. Only currently enrolled students or currently appointed faculty/staff may serve as officers and authorized agents. Such organizations are eligible for funding allocations from the Student Organization Resource Fee (SORF) (§ 3-505(i) (h)).
(E) that neither the organization nor its members shall discriminate on any basis prohibited by § 1-108(b).
(F) whether the organization is incorporated, and if so, in what jurisdiction.
(G) that the organization will make available, to any interested party who makes a request to the organization’s officers, if any, or authorized agent(s), its constitutions, bylaws, rules, and statements of purpose, and articles of incorporation, if such documents exist.
(H) that the organization agrees to abide by the regulations governing Registered Organizations and Registered Student Organization. (§§ 2-301 through 2-318 and §§ 2-501 through 2-512.)
(I) that the purpose of the organization does not violate any laws or University policies or regulations.

§ 3 506 Fee Waivers and Exemptions
(a) Students enrolled in Tuition Ranges III or IV (Range IV in summer) are assessed the General Fee and the Health Insurance Fee only and are exempt from all other remaining fees. Services covered by the remaining fees may be obtained by making individual arrangements with service providers. (See § 3-505 for such arrangements.

(b) Health Insurance Fee Waivers (1) graduate students with waiver-generating appointments, as defined in the section on tuition (See § 3-503(b)), receive a partial payment of the Health Insurance Fee.

(c) Health Insurance Fee Exemptions
(1) students presenting evidence of approved equivalent medical insurance coverage (See § 2-103.)
(2) students registered in absentia
(3) students registered in off-campus and/or study-abroad courses for zero credit; however, the fee is required of students in those categories registered for more than zero credit.
(4) University employees registered at the request of their departments in zero-credit courses especially established to improve work performance
(5) University employees registered as students but eligible for and participating in the mandatory State of Illinois Employees Insurance Program
(6) employees of specifically identified related agencies who are eligible automatically to receive hospital-medical coverage as an employee benefit at the cost of their employing agency
(7) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients
(8) Big Ten Academic Alliance (BTAA) Visiting Scholars
(9) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield

(d) Service Fee Waivers
(1) graduate students with waiver-generating appointments, as defined in the section on tuition (See § 3-503(b))
(2) foreign exchange students with a Service Fee waiver as part of the exchange contract
(3) graduate students with college-level waivers
(4) law students with Service Fee waivers
(5) participants in the International Exchange Program in Agriculture
(6) participants in the Bridge Program
(7) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients
(8) BTAA Visiting Scholars
(9) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(10) Department of Children and Family Services dependents

(e) Service Fee Exemptions
(1) students enrolled in Credit Ranges III or IV (Range IV in summer)
(2) students registered in absentia
(3) students registered in study-abroad programs
(4) students registered as participants in the official high school concurrent enrollment program
(5) students registered in recognized off-campus programs
(6) faculty or academic professional employees holding at least 25 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(7) staff members holding at least 50 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(8) employees (as defined in (6) and (7) above) holding appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(9) interinstitutional staff members
(10) cooperating teachers, administrators, or field supervisors, as defined in the section on tuition
(11) faculty, academic employees, or staff members of specifically identified related agencies
(12) University of Illinois faculty, academic professional, and staff retirees

(f) Academic Facilities Maintenance Fund Assessment Waivers
(1) graduate students with waiver-generating appointments, as defined in the section on tuition (See § 3-503(b))
(2) foreign exchange students with a Service Fee waiver as part of the exchange contract
(3) graduate students with college-level waivers
(4) law students with Service Fee waivers
(5) participants in the International Exchange Program in Agriculture <
(6) participants in the Bridge Program
(7) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients
(8) BTAA Visiting Scholars
(9) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(10) Department of Children and Family Services dependents

(g) Library/Information Technology Fee Exemptions
(1) students registered in absentia
(2) students registered in study-abroad programs
(3) students registered as participants in the official high school concurrent enrollment program
(4) students registered in recognized off-campus programs
(5) faculty or academic professional employees holding at least 25 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(6) staff members holding at least 50 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(7) employees (as defined in (5) and (6) above) holding appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(8) interinstitutional staff members
(9) cooperating teachers, administrators, or field supervisors, as defined in the section on tuition
(10) faculty, academic employees, or staff members of specifically identified related agencies
(11) University of Illinois faculty, academic professional, and staff retirees

(h) Library/Information Technology Fee Waivers
(1) graduate teaching or research assistants holding at least 25 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(2) foreign exchange students with a Service Fee waiver as part of the exchange contract
(3) holders of Graduate College waivers
(4) law students with Service Fee waivers
(5) participants in the International Exchange Program in Agriculture
(6) participants in the Bridge Program
(7) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients
(8) BTAA Visiting Scholars
(9) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(10) Department of Children and Family Services dependents

(i) Academic Facilities Maintenance Fund Assessment Exemptions
(1) students registered in absentia
(2) students registered in study-abroad programs
(3) students registered as participants in the official high school concurrent enrollment program
(4) students registered in recognized off-campus programs
(5) faculty or academic professional employees holding at least 25 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(6) staff members holding at least 50 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(7) employees (as defined in (5) and (6) above) holding appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(8) interinstitutional staff members
(9) cooperating teachers, administrators, or field supervisors, as defined in the section on tuition
(10) faculty, academic employees, or staff members of specifically identified related agencies
(11) University of Illinois faculty, academic professional, and staff retirees

(j) General Fee Waivers
(1) BTAA Visiting Scholars
(2) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(3) Department of Children and Family Services dependents
(4) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients

(k) General Fee Exemptions
(1) faculty or academic professional employees holding at least 25 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(2) staff members holding at least 50 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(3) employees (as defined in (1) and (2) above) holding appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(4) interinstitutional staff members
(5) cooperating teachers, administrators, or field supervisors, as defined in the section on tuition
(6) faculty, academic employees, or staff members of specifically identified related agencies
(7) University of Illinois faculty, academic professional, and staff retirees

(l) Health Service Fee Waivers
(1) graduate students with the waiver-generating appointments, as defined in the section on tuition (See § 3-503(b))
(2) BTAA Visiting Scholars
(3) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(4) Department of Children and Family Services dependents
(5) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients

(m) Health Service Fee Exemptions
(1) students enrolled in Credit Ranges III or IV (Range IV in summer)
(2) students registered in absentia
(3) students registered in study-abroad programs
(4) students registered as participants in the official high school concurrent enrollment program
(5) students registered in recognized off-campus programs
(6) faculty or academic professional employees holding at least 25 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(7) staff members holding at least 50 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(8) employees (as defined in (6) and (7) above) holding appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(9) interinstitutional staff members
(10) cooperating teachers, administrators, or field supervisors, as defined in the section on tuition
(11) faculty, academic employees, or staff members of specifically identified related agencies
(12) University of Illinois faculty, academic professional, and staff retirees
(13) University employees registered as students but eligible for the mandatory State of Illinois Employees Insurance Program

(n) Transportation Fee Waivers
(1) BTAA Visiting Scholars
(2) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(3) Department of Children and Family Services dependents
(4) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients

(o) Transportation Fee Exemptions
(1) students enrolled in Credit Ranges III or IV (Range IV in summer)
(2) students registered in absentia
(3) students registered in study-abroad programs
(4) students registered as participants in the official high school concurrent enrollment program

(p) Student Initiated Fee Waivers
(1) BTAA Visiting Scholars
(2) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(3) Department of Children and Family Services dependents
(4) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients

(q) Student Initiated Fees
(1) students enrolled in Credit Range III or IV (Range IV in summer)
(2) students registered in absentia
(3) students registered in study-abroad programs
(4) students registered as participants in the official high school concurrent enrollment program
(5) students registered in recognized off-campus programs
(6) faculty or academic professional employees holding at least 25 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(7) staff members holding at least 50 percent appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(8) faculty, academic employees, or staff members of a specifically identified related agency
(9) interinstitutional staff members
(10) cooperating teachers, administrators, or field supervisors, as defined in the section on tuition
(11) employees (as defined in (6) and (7) above) holding a combined appointment with the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(12) University of Illinois faculty, academic professional, and staff retirees

(r) SEAL, LSLS, SORF, CET, SCEF, SAS and CP Waivers
(1) BTAA Visiting Scholars
(2) students in concurrent enrollment at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(3) Department of Children and Family Services dependents
(4) Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients

(s) SEAL, LSLS, SORF, CET, SCEF, SAS and CP Exemptions
(1) students enrolled in Credit Range III or IV (Range IV in summer)
(2) students registered in absentia
(3) students registered in study-abroad programs
(4) students registered as participants in the official high school concurrent enrollment program
(5) students registered in recognized off-campus programs
(6) faculty or academic professional employees holding at least 25 percent time appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(7) staff members holding at least 50 percent appointments for three-fourths of the semester, as defined in the section on tuition
(8) employees (as defined in (6) and (7) above) holding appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield
(9) interinstitutional staff members
(10) cooperating teachers, administrators, or field supervisors, as defined in the section on tuition
(11) faculty, academic employees, or staff members of specifically identified related agencies
(12) University of Illinois faculty, academic professional, and staff retirees

§ 3 704 Description and Definition of Information Appearing on Transcripts (c)(2)
(c) Transfer Credit
(1) Undergraduate credit earned at another accredited University or college and accepted by the University of Illinois is recorded in semester hours. Grades earned are not indicated.
(2) Graduate credit earned at another accredited University or college and accepted by the University of Illinois will be indicated on the transcript with the institution’s name, total credit hours, GPA hours, Grade Points, and total GPA. GPA hours and Total GPA will generally be zero because the grade value of accepted transfer credit is recorded as “CR,” for satisfactory, without differentiation by letter grade, except for courses transferred for work taken at the University of Illinois at Chicago or at Springfield or as a BTAA Traveling Scholar. Graduate credit earned at another accredited university or college and accepted by the University of Illinois prior to Fall 2004 will be indicated on the transcript as total transfer credit without indication of the institution(s) attended.